A digital magazine on sexuality, based in the Global South: We are working towards cultivating safe, inclusive, and self-affirming spaces in which all individuals can express themselves without fear, judgement or shame

Sexual Violence

A wall completely covered with multicoloured, abstract graffiti

Editorial – Spaces and Sexuality

A space can make us feel constricted or liberated, and sometimes even both at the same and at varying times. The combination of spaces that we may be occupying in the moment, as well as those we have in the past, predisposes us to act, feel and experience our sexuality in different ways.
A graphic illustration of a pattern. The dominant colours are yellow, orange, grey, blue, and black. Blocks of colour emerge from a cluttered centre and emanate upwards.

Violation of Sexual and Reproductive Health Rights (SRHR): Where are the Women With Disabilities?

What vindicates the argument that women with disabilities (WWDs) should be deprived of sexual and reproductive healthcare and rights is scary. Harmful stereotypes of WWDs include the belief that they are hypersexual, incapable, irrational and lacking control. These narratives are then often used to build other perceptions such as that WWDs are inherently vulnerable and should be ‘protected from sexual attack’.
Abstract art, coloured in shades of olive green, black, peach, pink, yellow, orange, and purple. It appears to show two silhouettes, to the left are distinct parts of a woman's face and to the right a darker silhouette looking at these parts.

Media and the Power of Responsible Representation

It is the winter of 2013, and my father and I are sitting at an awkward distance from each other on the living room couch, our eyes trained on the television set as a popular prime time news debate discusses a subject we have never before talked to each other about – homosexuality. It is…
A screenshot of Kalki Koechlin's rendition of 'The Printing Machine'. The background has a fade-effect of newspaper headlines. To the left is Kalki's face till the beginning of her shoulders. She is looking directly at the camera. Her hair is tied with strands across her face. To the left, in big red lettering: KALKI an underneath it, in black and strikethrough: UNBLUSHED. 'BLUSH' is bold.

Video: Kalki Koechlin: The Printing Machine | Unblushed

Sharp and evocative, Kalki Koechlin’s spoken-word poem The Printing Machine lays bare the cycle of ceaseless and desensitised consumption engendered by the media. Kalki’s short and hard-hitting sentences, keys tap-tap-tapping, and the chrrs and grrs of printing machines bring out the urgency and sensationalism media narratives embody, turning incidents of violence into a stream of headlines that make us gasp and forget, gasp and forget.
The cover image of the article with the typography, in white, 'On Sexuality, Representation, and Being a Lonely Brown Girl' and under it in smaller font: September 12, 2017 / Nisha Eswaran' The background is a fade-effect illustration of a brown woman wearing a white-lilac top with black hair open. She is standing in a field of sunflowers, yellow and brown with green leaves and brown-black mountains far back. The woman's face has been made without any features.

On Sexuality, Representation, and Being a Lonely Brown Girl

I long for much more than a greater representation of brown women. I long for a complete overhaul of the racial, gendered, and economic systems that structure our suffering. But I also long for representation of all people, including brown women, who are in love, who are loveable, and who are — in the absence of love — lonely.
On a pick background, a photograph of a drop of water splashing.

CATAMITE

On the other hand, in Abhay’s newly discovered wonderland, everything seemed to be awfully right. Soon, he began receiving proposals for sex-dates. Initially such proposals shocked him; for it took him a few months to get used to the fact that sex with men was only a click away.
A photograph of disability rights advocate and activist Amba Salelkar

Interview – Amba Salelkar

But not every issue of discrimination and conflict can go to a court.Say for example, affording privacy to a young adult with disability to understand their body and sexual responses, or enabling them to access accessible sex toys or assistive devices related to sexual pleasure.
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