A digital magazine on sexuality in the Global South: We are working towards cultivating safe, inclusive, and self-affirming spaces in which all individuals can express themselves without fear, judgement or shame

Brushstrokes

Graphic of a person at an office desk. The person is reclining on a chair with hands behind their head and looks relaxed. There is a mug of warm beverage, a desktop, a keyboard and a mouse on the table. On the upper left corner is the title of the graphic story that reads “The First Move…” Right below with is the credits to the writer and illustrator, Priya Dali and text reads “Written and illustrated by Priya Dali”. Below it is another line of text - “#QUEERINGWITHTINDER”.

Graphic Story: The First Move

This short and cute graphic story by Priya Dali, published by Gaysi in collaboration with Tinder, captures the playful initial stages of online dating as Maya tries to make the first move on Rae with the help of colleagues.

Brushstrokes: Labour and Sexuality: 12+ Ways Job Applications Discriminate Against Applicants

Orginal link: https://everydayfeminism.com/2017/07/jobs-discriminate-applicants/   Leave aside being able to get and retain a job, sometimes even being considered for one can be a matter of privilege. This comic from Everyday Feminism shows how it’s not only factors like gender, disability, or place of residence, but many other less ‘obvious’ ones that could lead to one…

Brushstrokes: Having Trouble Explaining Oppression?

We often use the words prejudice, discrimination, and oppression interchangeably, and while they intersect and feed into each other within our larger socio-political, cultural, and economic context, they are different. This Robot Hugs comic in Everyday Feminism illustrates the shapes prejudice, discrimination, and oppression take, the cycle of systemic marginalisation they are part of, and…

Video: Disability and Sex

Dr. Lindsey Doe debunks myths around disability and sexuality, at once carving out space for affirming and inclusive discussions and challenging negative and harmful stereotypes. Emphasising the sexuality of people with disabilities as rich and diverse, Lindsey wonders what inclusive sexual and reproductive health and rights really mean.
A screenshot from Robot Hugs' comic. The background is purple and has a figure wearing a darker purple shirt and grey pants. Their hair is green and they are looking curiously and confusedly at the illustration of the female reproductive system to their left. The figure of the reproductive system is coloured in light and dark shades of pink and has a black question mark in the middle. The text, to the right of the figure, says "But I am already whole and complete, and I am not full of empty spaces."

Brushstrokes: Dear Sex-Ed Textbook

Robot Hugs gives us a glimpse into the doubts and confusions they grappled with while growing up, and unravels the tightly wound preconceptions in culture influenced by, and at the same time, influencing scientific and medical imagination.
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