A digital magazine on sexuality in the Global South
migration and sexuality

The Editorial: Migration and Sexuality

Talking about migration would be talking about what happens with the crossing of boundaries. Boundaries of culture and climate, and boundaries of visibility, where a change in semantics can come to render what was invisible visible (an accent, perhaps a way of dressing, one’s values and ideas, the experience of being surveilled as an alien), while also allowing the migrant certain new freedoms to be invisible (anonymity where ‘nobody knows your name’, and certain kinds of agency one may not have enjoyed back home).
Foreign marriage and women’s rights

महिलाओं का विवाह पश्चात् ‘प्रवसन’ और उससे जुड़े कुछ मुद्दे

यूँ तो विवाह और उससे जुड़े महिलाओं के ‘स्थान परिवर्तन’ को ‘प्रवसन’ का दर्ज़ा दिया ही नहीं जाता है, इसको एक अपरिहार्य व्यवस्था की तरह देखा जाता है जिसमें पत्नी का स्थान पति के साथ ही है, चाहे वो जहाँ भी जाए। पूर्वी एशियाई देशों में, १९८० के दशक के बाद से एक बड़ी संख्या में महिलाओं के विवाह पश्चात् प्रवसन का चलन देखा गया है जिन्हें ‘फॉरेन ब्राइड’ या विदेशी वधु के नाम से जाना जाता है। इन देशों की लिस्ट में भारत के साथ जापान, चीन, ताइवान, सिंगापुर, कोरिया, नेपाल जैसे कई देशों के नाम हैं। यदि विवाह से जुड़े प्रवसन को कुल प्रवसन के आकड़ों के साथ जोड़ा जाए तो शायद ये महिलाओं का सबसे बड़ा प्रवसन होगा।
Ali Fear Eats the Soul

Reel Review: Romance Across Age and Race in ‘Ali: Fear Eats the Soul’

Emmi Kurowski (Brigitte Mira), a widow in her sixties, walks into a bar to take shelter from the rain. She is met with hostile stares by a mixed group of Moroccan immigrants and Germans. As a joke, one of his friends challenges Ali (El Hedi ben Salem m'Barek Mohammed Mustafa), a young strapping Berber man, to ask her for a dance. He agrees, and thus begins a romance across the taboo lines of race and age.
Young Artist Ayqa Khan Wants to Give South Asian Women the Spotlight They Deserve

A Young Artist Wants to Give South Asian Women the Spotlight They Deserve

The women she draws, flanked by a mix of traditional South Asian motifs and totems of youthful American culture, are not hiding their stubble. They sit, stand and kneel in poses that do anything but hide their hair, as they smoke cavalierly behind a box of 'mithai' or cruise across a roller rink. More often than not, her female subjects are seen legs and arms outstretched, faces calm, cool and collected amid a backdrop of saturated purples, greens and oranges.
Being a Black, British, Queer, Non-Binary Muslim Isn't a Contradiction

Being a Black, British, Queer, Non-binary Muslim Isn’t a Contradiction

If I asked you to define yourself, would you know how to respond? We like to think we are all complex individuals who can’t be reduced to descriptors, but often there are moments when we are forced to identify with something – to label ourselves Somali, black, queer, working class, Muslim or gender nonconforming. Everything on that list applies to me. It may be that none of them apply to you, but does that matter?
Good South Asian Girls Marry Doctors: Brave Voices on Daughterhood

Good Girls Marry Doctors: Brave Voices On Daughterhood In South Asian American Families

To all the American daughters of South Asian immigrants: Have you ever felt that you just can’t be a Good Girl? Your parents and South Asian community have likely tried drilling in you that Good Girls follow the path of academic excellence, a well-paying job (doctor, lawyer, or engineer), marriage to a well-paid Desi man (preferably a doctor), and then a happy house with kids. Obedience to parents, no dating (at least not while a student), and virginity until marriage are absolutes.
Where Did South Asian Sexuality Go?

What Made South Asians Lose Their Sexuality?

The British went to South Asia with their preconceived notions of sexual normalcy stemming from enlightenment and Christian ideals. If anything, it was the British who were the prudes and sexually repressed venturing into India, rather than the sexually liberated souls they claim to be today.
Queer, undocumented migrant artist Julio Salgado uses his art for activism

Brushstrokes: Queer, Undocumented Migrant Artist Uses His Art for Activism

“Yo existo. I exist,” asserts Julio Salgado’s self-portrait drawn with wings that give him identity. Salgado was eleven years old when he crossed the border from Mexico to the United States where he remains an undocumented resident. Risking arrest and deportation if detected, Julio makes art about his experiences of being a queer and undocumented person of colour.
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