A digital magazine on sexuality, based in the Global South: We are working towards cultivating safe, inclusive, and self-affirming spaces in which all individuals can express themselves without fear, judgement or shame

Fiction

an illustration showing the solar system

Finding Lit’s Political Potentials

Fiction is often relegated to a secondary stow because fact-based forms of knowledge are becoming more and more valued. To be informed is to stay with the facts. Yet I think fiction allows us to stay just about as informed.
Image of Kiran Bhat

Interview – Kiran Bhat

Kiran Bhat is an author and polyglot who speaks 12 languages, and has written in English, Kannada, Spanish, Portuguese, and Mandarin. His recently published book, We Of the Forsaken World, has been described as “the tales of not just sixteen strangers, but many different lives, who live on this planet, at every second, everywhere”.

I COLUMN : FICTION AND SEXUALITY

Her eyes are open now, she looks at him. There is sadness there. “What my love? What happened?” he asks. “Nothing,” she lies, her heart not in the lie. “Something, tell me,” he holds her, insisting. “The bull,” she whispers, “I dreamt of her.” He stares at her, mute. Rolls out of bed and walks…
Painting of trees, birds, butterflies, fish superimposed on a piece of written paper.

The Editorial: Fiction and Sexuality

For many of us, it was fiction that fed our souls as children, and now as adults who are still ‘growing up’, it feeds us still. Fiction makes, remakes and unmakes us who walk in worlds of the imagination. It liberates us to dream various versions of ourselves and others into being as the articles in this month’s In Plainspeak eloquently reveal.
Cartoon of a little girl walking down a road engrossed in a book.

Issue in Focus: “Is that Book Feminist?”

Fiction is a realm within which we can imagine the limitlessness of our feminist realities. By censoring fiction itself in an anxiety to perform what we understand as feminism, is to censor our imaginations, its subtle negotiations with reality and its potential in generating desires and dreams we hardly knew of. Does this mean we don’t critique books and movies? Definitely not! Critique is fun. Critique is important. Critique is how we grow. But the judgement needs to stop.
An abstract art of a spiral starting with fiery orange and yellow in the middle, with shades of blue on the outside.

Making women out of men: Mystifying queer desires, staging queerness in Siraj’s Māyā Mridanga

Māyā Mridanga infinitely problematises the nature vs. nurture debate that is central to sexuality studies. The novel seems to suggest that a certain kind of male body – feminine, smooth, shapely – is the ideal raw material for making a chhokra out of a biological man. Ustaad Jhaksa, whose life the novel documents[2], repeatedly emphasises on this act of nurturing, moulding and pruning of a feminine male body for which he has fatherly affection as well as a lover’s lust.
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