A digital magazine on sexuality, based in the Global South: We are working towards cultivating safe, inclusive, and self-affirming spaces in which all individuals can express themselves without fear, judgement or shame

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The cover image of the article with the typography, in white, 'On Sexuality, Representation, and Being a Lonely Brown Girl' and under it in smaller font: September 12, 2017 / Nisha Eswaran' The background is a fade-effect illustration of a brown woman wearing a white-lilac top with black hair open. She is standing in a field of sunflowers, yellow and brown with green leaves and brown-black mountains far back. The woman's face has been made without any features.

On Sexuality, Representation, and Being a Lonely Brown Girl

I long for much more than a greater representation of brown women. I long for a complete overhaul of the racial, gendered, and economic systems that structure our suffering. But I also long for representation of all people, including brown women, who are in love, who are loveable, and who are — in the absence of love — lonely.
Poster image of the video ‘Friendship and Vulnerability’. Drawing of two people eating ice cream can be seen in the image. On the left side is written Friendship and Vulnerability in capital letters

Video: Friendship & Vulnerability

We are often told to speak to ourselves as we would to a friend, gently and lovingly. At the heart of friendship is vulnerability – a radical acceptance of oneself and another for who we truly are, the glowing and beautiful, as well as the dark and crooked.
A close-up photograph of a dandelion with dew. The dewdrops are differently coloured in the light.

Editorial: Femininities and Sexuality

Are certain forms of femininities denigrated more than others? Not just by misogynists but also by feminists? Is there a particular way of manifesting an ‘appropriate’ femininity, one that is just right, and is not ‘too girly’ or ‘too tomboyish’?
A photograph of the author, Di Sands

Tomboy Femininity

When I finally came out to myself at age 16 and made it to a free queer youth space, I couldn’t wait to be accepted among folks who didn’t play by society’s heterosexist rules of masculine and feminine as polar opposites.
Two dandelion flowers in a glass vase on a pink background.

A ‘girly’ feminist

Desiring motherhood meant veering into a more ‘girly’ territory, a notion that I had simultaneously been fighting and trying to embrace since childhood. I had understood that to be a feminist I had to be independent, be wary of men, dislike families and relationships.
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