A digital magazine on sexuality in the Global South: We are working towards cultivating safe, inclusive, and self-affirming spaces in which all individuals can express themselves without fear, judgement or shame

Communities

Interview – Poornima Sukumar

We advocate the idea of reclaiming spaces in society by creating large wall-mural projects to raise awareness and to create a voice for the community. We are now finding more innovative ways to engage the community to come out in public spaces, also using the Internet and social media, to feel confident, safe and a sense of belonging.
A tree with multitudinous leaves branching out from all sides

The Editorial: Communities and Sexuality

To belong or not to belong? Some people define themselves through commonalities. There are some who define themselves through difference and then seek to find others who share that difference. They find commonality in a shared difference. Commonality is what makes for a community. To keep that commonality becomes an unwritten rule. What lets you in? What keeps you out? Every community tries to keep its members together. There are expectations, rules, impositions and, for the dissidents, punishments. Ironically, even communities of people who do not conform to mainstream norms of sexuality or gender have their own norms.
winds of change in communities

Community and Sexuality: Learning a Politics of Unbelonging

After writing the words “Community and Sexuality” as the working title of this piece, I attempted to begin writing many times, but kept getting stuck at “community” and its meaning. I kept coming back to this common phrase that we hear often in conversations, “hamare yahaan...”, “hum logon mein...”,[1] or the many variations of the…
Its a still from the movie, Khamosh Pani,featuring Kirron Kher, standing with her back towards two men, one is a Sikh wearing a red turban offering something to the woman and the other man is looking towards them. Screen reader support enabled. Its a still from the movie, Khamosh Pani,featuring Kirron Kher, standing with her back towards two men, one is a Sikh wearing a red turban offering something to the woman and the other man is looking towards them.

Review: Khamosh Pani – What heaven is there for me?

Who fights, who flees and who flows with the tide? Branching off from the community, with all the comforts that it offers, can become a true test of character.This year marks the 70th anniversary of the Partition of India – a significant chapter in our history when millions of people were faced with this dilemma.
a cartoon sketch of the yin and yang symbol

The Paradox of Principles

I do not feel the need to fight the feminist war within these spaces all the time, now that it has become my home. I have come to terms with the idea that certain contradictions can co-exist peacefully like the yin and yang. But still, sometimes, my mind is roiled in conflict, with me cautiously trying to balance my two identities – the feminist and the army officer’s wife. Nevertheless, I am unwilling to give up one for the other (even if I might be perceived as being less of one of them). So I continue to be an individual with two seeming contradictions: a feminist army-officer’s-wife!
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