A digital magazine on sexuality in the Global South

Mythology

A doodle of a woman hugging herself. At the top is written "and here you are living despite it all -rupi kaur"

Editorial: Time and Sexuality

Take Time. Add Sexuality to it. How does it move? In a straight line, in circles, or does it zig and then zag? Does it loop around to the very beginning? Move in spirals? Wind down and stop? Going by the articles this month, it seems to do all this and more. Most people consider…
Photo of Devdutt Pattanaik, with Shikhandi on Krishna's chariot in the background.
Photo Credit: Devdutt Pattanaik with Shikhandi on Krishna's chariot in the background

Interview: Devdutt Pattanaik

Devdutt Pattanaik writes on relevance of mythology in modern times, especially in areas of management, governance and leadership. Trained in medicine, he worked for 15 years in the healthcare and pharma industries before he focussed on his passion full time. He is author of 30 books and 600 columns, with bestsellers such as My Gita, Jaya, Sita, Business Sutra and the 7 Secret Series.
Doodle of two male gods sitting together closely, hugging. One has rested his head on the other's shoulder.

Bromances from mythology

Biblical scholars, who value abstinence, reject such sexual interpretations, but not modern LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer) activists, who have even traced formal same-sex unions in Church liturgy called adelphopoiesis or “brother-making”. We see what we want to see. We allow what we are comfortable with, and what we are mature about. Love is indeed a splendid thing. But sex remains a bad habit.
Anita Ratnam in an orange saree doing Bharatnayam outside an old temple.

Interview: Anita Ratnam

In December TARSHI interviewed Anita Ratnam, who is a leading Bharatanatyam dancer and choreographer based in Chennai. In her own words, she is in dance, “because this is my own way of connecting with myself and the world.  I consider myself a contemporary classicist.” As a supporter of contemporary Indian dancing, she spoke about the…
A boy performing Bharatnatyam on stage. He wears kajal, and an orange dupatta hung around his neck falls from both sides till his waist. The photo ends at his torso.

A Lingering Tingle

I started learning Bharatanatyam in 1988, when I was six years old. Looking back, it feels like beginning to learn to dance was, somehow, a key moment in my personal gender and sexuality history. It was the time I started, formally, to condition and train my body to move in specific ways. Earlier, in school,…
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