A digital magazine on sexuality, based in the Global South: We are working towards cultivating safe, inclusive, and self-affirming spaces in which all individuals can express themselves without fear, judgement or shame

obscenity

Photo of a smartphone screen displaying the logos of Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and Clubhouse.

A ‘Room’ of One’s Own – Sexuality, Self-expression, and Safe Spaces on Clubhouse

In theory, the concept of the app is a great one – it provides women, queer people, and people belonging to oppressed castes the tea-stall, cigarette-shop type of public spaces for conversation that are available to upper-caste cis het men. The relative anonymity acts like a safe cover, and the app affords a certain autonomy and agency to marginalised people to regulate the kind of conversation that goes on in rooms moderated by them.
In the image, two people are sitting on a bench near a lake. The Sun is shining brightly and its reflection can be seen on the lake. A white and red coloured house can also be seen

PDA: Slippery Slope from Law to Moral Policing

Sexuality is taboo in our context, and expressions of it publicly or even in the home setting outside the bedroom, especially by those who are not in ‘legitimate’ relationships ‘alarm the modesty’ and are generally considered anti-culture or simply categorised as Western concepts.

ILLEGALLY ADULT: THE STRANGE CASE OF ALISHA MAJOR

She was 17 when she was rescued from a dance bar. Now she’s 18 and she wants to go back. As an adult. And dance again. That’s what Alisha wrote in a letter to the Child Welfare Committee. Alisha’s letter may be one of a kind. It doesn’t matter. It may even be a scam of sorts, in that she…
Black-and-white photo of Indian bharatnatyma dancer Rukmini Devi holding a mudra. She is wearing traditional dance clothing with flowers in her head, and jewellery on the forehead, ears, and neck. The image is from the chest up.

Illegally Adult: The Strange Case of Alisha Major

She was 17 when she was rescued from a dance bar. Now she's 18 and she wants to go back. As an adult. And dance again. That's what Alisha wrote in a letter to the Child Welfare Committee. Alisha’s letter may be one of a kind. It doesn’t matter. It may even be a scam of sorts, in that she was pushed to write it. Doesn't matter. What’s interesting is the jumble that it throws up, if you look at her choices through eyes that are not hers.
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