A digital magazine on sexuality in the Global South: We are working towards cultivating safe, inclusive, and self-affirming spaces in which all individuals can express themselves without fear, judgement or shame

Anthropology

A self-conscious white woman with her arms crossed uncomfortably, wearing an Indian dress of bright orange-coloured suit with a green khadi jacket.

I Spent a Year in India and I Looked Ridiculous!

Despite the intervention of many well-meaning aunties and friends over cups of chai, I don’t think I was aware of how truly strange, let’s even say ridiculous, I looked at the time. Because although I was wearing kurtis nearly every day, I didn’t really understand the ‘rules’ of wearing kurtis.
Back of a woman with boy-cut hair, wearing red sweater, and a green shawl round her neck, looking at the view from a terrace. She can see houses and more houses.

Notes from the Field: What Single Women in Delhi Taught Me about Sexuality

The women taught me how to navigate the city, as I learnt about the different ways the body is marked in public (and in private too). I often tried to discern when ‘bold’ became ‘reckless’, and what the underlying politics of this rhetoric shift might be. How arguments were stacked up pre-emptively determining who was deserving of protection and whose transgressions left them out in the cold.
Illustration of a woman with larger blodily proportions and short hair carrying a shorter person on her back

Freak Shows: Looking at Human Bodies on Exhibit

No two human bodies are alike, and our different bodies arouse curiosity. But our fascination for the aesthetics of the perfect human body has historically created a space within art, science and religion for the examination of the 'abnormal' and the 'imperfect'. As a result, some bodies are normalised while others become oddities.
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