A digital magazine on sexuality in the Global South

Author: Kaustav Bakshi

A drawing of a face with closed eyes. The face has been coloured with pink, blue, black, mustard, yellow and red crayons.

TOGETHER, ALONE

It wasn’t that she had never heard of homosexuality; but, in her imagination, gay men and women were an exotic species, not real people who could, perchance, be fellow passengers on a bus, fellow shoppers at a mall, or a fellow beginner in a meditation class.
On a pick background, a photograph of a drop of water splashing.

CATAMITE

On the other hand, in Abhay’s newly discovered wonderland, everything seemed to be awfully right. Soon, he began receiving proposals for sex-dates. Initially such proposals shocked him; for it took him a few months to get used to the fact that sex with men was only a click away.
Friendship, Sexuality and the Auden Group

Friendship, Sexuality and the Auden Group

Friendship has always remained a thinly coded term for same-sex love within queer discourses, and early writings in favour of homosexuality frequently revisited this trope to historicise and naturalise same-sex desire. In this article I shall recount an interesting story of three friends – three eminent figures in the history of English modernist literature –…
An abstract art of a spiral starting with fiery orange and yellow in the middle, with shades of blue on the outside.

Making women out of men: Mystifying queer desires, staging queerness in Siraj’s Māyā Mridanga

Māyā Mridanga infinitely problematises the nature vs. nurture debate that is central to sexuality studies. The novel seems to suggest that a certain kind of male body – feminine, smooth, shapely – is the ideal raw material for making a chhokra out of a biological man. Ustaad Jhaksa, whose life the novel documents[2], repeatedly emphasises on this act of nurturing, moulding and pruning of a feminine male body for which he has fatherly affection as well as a lover’s lust.
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