A digital magazine on sexuality in the Global South

work

An abstract painting of various shapes on a canvas

Editorial: Mobility and Sexuality

In our mid-month issue, Mahika Banerji describing herself as being ‘massively function-less’ and as having ‘no mobility’, takes us into her world, not a world of sob stories but one that holds promise of fulfillment...
A woman with long dark hair stares into her phone, seemingly taking a selfie

On TikTok, the Party Don’t Start Till These Women Walk In

But TikTok is giving young people – particularly women – in South Asia a new avenue to showcase their talents. While for the majority of women using the app their fame is exclusive to TikTok, an increasing number are able to use it to get paid work. And for many, the platform represents a scarce opportunity for bodily autonomy, and a chance to carve out space as a performer in the face of film and fashion industries that shut them out.

Not a Job for Women?

A year ago, just ten minutes after I had landed in the Punjab and Haryana High Court. I was introduced to this young lawyer – not the least bit enthusiastic, a big critic of the law, of lawyers, of the High Court, and most importantly, of women. “Let me tell you a secret: law is not a profession for girls,” said he.
Photo of an empty classroom. Chairs, desks, teacher's table and a clean blackboard are visible.

The Editorial: Work and Sexuality

Sexuality can be said to influence and be influenced by every aspect of our lives. Talking about sexuality, however, is widely tabooed, especially at the workplace. Anything that evinces sexuality is at once mired in controversy – from clothing choices (of women, especially) to sexual harassment cases, from gender role-challenging career choices to sex work. Why is anything to do with sexuality seen as taking away the gravitas of work?
Screenshot from a video. A middle-aged Indian woman sitting in a crowded bus. She is wearing orange saree, red bindi, and specks.

Video Page: A Day in the Life of India

A short movie with a twist ending, Belle de Jour (meaning ‘Beauty of the Day’, and this one is not the 1967 film by Luis Buñuel) begins by showing a stereotypical middle-class Indian woman who goes to work after taking care of her household.
A black-and-white photo of a woman in jeans and tee-shirt bent down to clean a glass vitrine in a museum.

Review: Art in the Age of Maintenance Work

Written in one sitting in Philadelphia, Ukeles’ manifesto was a manifestation of the rage she felt when she was pregnant with her first child and a male mentor proclaimed, “Well, Mierle, I guess you know you can’t be an artist now.”
Psychedelic art

And He Said, ‘I Love You, Masti’

One morning at the programme, I found he was ignoring me. I was also busy with my assigned work so I was not able to follow up with him until the break. During the break, he came and sat next to me, came closer and suddenly kissed me on the cheek.
x