A digital magazine on sexuality in the Global South

Editorial

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Editorial: Freedom and Sexuality

Freedom and sexuality – it sounds so liberating to some. But to some others, freedom is the spark that can light the powder keg of sexuality. And that is why the sexual freedoms we have are so precious. In Freedom and an F word, Radhika Chandiramani brings us face to face with a thought that…

Editorial: Time and Sexuality

Take Time. Add Sexuality to it. How does it move? In a straight line, in circles, or does it zig and then zag? Does it loop around to the very beginning? Move in spirals? Wind down and stop? Going by the articles this month, it seems to do all this and more. Most people consider…
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The Editorial : Caste and Sexuality

A deeply entrenched issue in Indian society, the monster of caste, as Dr. Ambedkar called it, derides, tramples upon, rips asunder, and rapaciously brutalizes not only potential matings and marriages but also the most delicate and fragile burgeonings of desire as well as the aspirations of those who seek being other than what they are…
fiction and sexuality

The Editorial: Fiction and Sexuality

For many of us, it was fiction that fed our souls as children, and now as adults who are still ‘growing up’, it feeds us still. Fiction makes, remakes and unmakes us who walk in worlds of the imagination. It liberates us to dream various versions of ourselves and others into being as the articles in this month’s In Plainspeak eloquently reveal.

The Editorial: Accessibility and Sexuality

We can speak of many situations in terms of access or its lack for all kinds of people, and it will always give us insight into the society we live in in two interdependent ways: one, it reveals a polarity between who is given and who is denied access, and two, it determines the big-picture human value given to the commodity that the access is contested for.
The Editorial: Communities and Sexuality

The Editorial: Communities and Sexuality

To belong or not to belong? Some people define themselves through commonalities. There are some who define themselves through difference and then seek to find others who share that difference. They find commonality in a shared difference. Commonality is what makes for a community. To keep that commonality becomes an unwritten rule. What lets you in? What keeps you out? Every community tries to keep its members together. There are expectations, rules, impositions and, for the dissidents, punishments. Ironically, even communities of people who do not conform to mainstream norms of sexuality or gender have their own norms.
editorial

The Editorial: The Internet and Sexuality

Our desire to connect is perhaps one of the human aspirations that both Sexuality and the Internet serve. And with the Internet we now have new ways, unthought of even twenty years ago, of connecting with each other, and even at times with ourselves, finding aspects of our selves that we did not know existed.
The Editorial: Money and Sexuality

The Editorial: Money and Sexuality

Aspects of sexuality such as aesthetic taste, body image, sexual orientation, desires and aspirations, self-esteem, gender expression, reproductive choices, and more, are all interdependent with the impact of money in our lives and that of those around us. Indeed, our systemic relationship with money has a direct influence on how we ‘value’ ourselves.
What do Boundaries and Sexuality Have to do with Each Other?

The Editorial: Boundaries and Sexuality

The boundaries are the most interesting bits. No definitions can be identified without them, and yet they themselves remain in a state of flux – neither here nor there, neither this nor that, but both, all, nothing, and so much more. None can stake their claim on the borderland; it is unseizable, enigmatic, most ungraspable. In its ambiguity it has the power to comfort the outlier at its best, and at its worst, leave bereft those who seek refuge in the absolute.
March in ‘In Plainspeak': Marriage and Sexuality

The Editorial: Marriage and Sexuality

Traditionally, marriage and sexuality have been bagged together and tinted with a bed-of-roses romance that has, over the last century or so, been unpacked and critiqued for propagating oppressive societal structures of gender, class, caste, and sexuality. Indeed, marriage isn’t just about two wedded souls matched in heaven, but about earthly ties that reach far beyond the couple it binds together. What happens when the roses are let out of the bag? This month’s issues of In Plainspeak on Marriage and Sexuality invite us to lean in and take a whiff.
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