A digital magazine on sexuality in the Global South

2013       2014      2015     2016     2017     2018

2013

December: Sexual Rights

2014

January: Queer Rights

February: Consent and Coercion 

March: Women

April: Safe Abortion

May: Body Image

June: Law and Sexuality

July: Art and Activism

August: Disability and Sexuality

September: Sports and Sexuality

October: Popular Media and Sexuality

November: Mobility and Sexuality

December: Anniversary Issue                                                             

2015

January: Music, Dance and Sexuality

February: Comprehensive Sexuality Education

March: Women and Sexuality

April: Mental Health and Sexuality

May: Family and Sexuality

June: The Body and Sexuality

July: Technology and Sexuality

AugustLet’s Talk Sexuality

September: The Post-2015 Development Agenda, and Sexuality

October: Food, Drink and Sexuality

November: Feminism and Sexuality

December: HIV and Sexuality

2016

January: Humour and Sexuality 

February: Love and Sexuality

March: Travel and Sexuality

April: Sex Work and Sexuality

May: Relationships and Sexuality

June: Work and Sexuality

July: Science and Sexuality

August: Attire and Sexuality

September: Migration and Sexuality

October: Parenting and Sexuality

November: Fantasy and Sexuality 

December: People’s Movements and Sexuality

2017

 

January: Films and Sexuality
Cinema is an influential medium, through which a lot of important ideas and beliefs can be articulated and internalised. The patterns of behavior we see on screen are what we often subsconsciously repeat in our daily lives, and so, the representations of sexuality we see on this medium also play a major role in informing our personal engagements with sexuality. Whether it’s through the way sex is portrayed, or through the way the female body is either given agency or eroded of agency, or the way queer individuals are represented – films are a reflection of culture and society, and by extension, the way society perceives aspects of sexuality. This month’s issue of In Plainspeak engages with these questions, and attempts to map the relationship between sexuality and cinema, and how this relationship affects the audience consuming it.

February: Self Care and Sexuality
Though it might seem innocuous, but the act of caring for oneself is innately feminist. Self-care involves an understanding of the self (which expands to both one’s body and sexuality) and an acceptance of it, which are both radical in a culture that seems to police or add undue pressure on physical and emotional manifestations of the self. Self-care is as much about developing bodily autonomy as much it is about psychological wellbeing, and is as much about learning to develop confidence and agency in one’s sexuality as much it is about physical health. This month’s issue of In Plainspeak takes an introspective look these processes function, and how self-care influences the way in which we experience and express sexuality and body image.

March: Marriage and Sexuality
While on the one hand, marriage can be a celebration of love, commitment and sexuality, on the other, it can be an inherently oppressive institution. Marriage has been traditionally romanticised as a spiritually pure union between two souls, but it isn’t always the ‘bed of roses’ that it is meant to signify. In fact, when seen through a critical lens, one might find structures of patriarchy, heteronormativity, class and caste running rife within it. But with changing societal norms, marriages can also evolve from its conventionalism into an empowering, positive and equal partnership. This month’s issue of In Plainspeak explores these dichotomies that are intrinsic to marriage, tackling topics ranging from the question of choice (or the lack thereof), to gender roles, to same-sex marriage, and more.

April: Boundaries and Sexuality
Drawing lines are useful in defining ideas; boundaries of personal space help keep us secure from unwanted advances, boundaries of privacy help cultivate our creativity and thought, boundaries of age aid us in determining the right kind of nourishment to give young ones or the attention and care to give to those who are ageing. There are also times when boundaries can limit us; discrimination can turn into discrimination against, and the lines that helped us mark meaning in our world can hinder accessibility, opportunity, and growth. In Plainspeak’s April issue examines boundaries both real and imagined in their influence on sexuality.

May: Money and Sexuality
How does having money, wanting money, and using money play into how we express our sexuality? Can money buy us sexual satisfaction or professional satisfaction? Can it help our self-esteem and body image? How does money make sex work, and what relationship does sex work have with money? How do aspects of our sexualityinfluence our ties to money? When money can influence the trajectory of our lives, In Plainspeak’s May issue ventures to ask how this currency interacts with our sexuality.

June: Internet and Sexuality
The ‘virtual’ world and the ‘real’ world no longer simply co-exist, they flow seamlessly as part of each other. The internet has grown more than its initial accompaniment to the IRL (in real life) expression and politics of sexuality. Our online presence now informs our sexual, social and intellectual lives as much as any other form of interaction. The June issues of In Plainspeak explores the intersections of worlds and personas in the landscape of human sexuality.

July: Communities and Sexuality
There are communities we actively choose and create, and there are those whose associations with us we spend our lifetimes investigating. They say we can’t choose our families but we can choose our friends. While that may be true or not, what influences do aspects of community and sexuality have upon each other? How do they define us as individuals apart from and together as parts of a society? This and more in In Plainspeak’s July issues on Communities and Sexuality.

August: Accessibility and Sexuality
We often find that realising the ideals of equality of opportunity when talking in terms of both accessibility and sexuality issues, is an effort encrusted with complexities. Being inclusive doesn’t come easy, but worthy efforts are made every day all around the world that build on valuing the diversity of each of our lived experiences. Taking some of them into account, In Plainspeak’s August issues on Accessibility and Sexuality articulate and reframe ideas woven into our social fabric.

September: Fiction and Sexuality
Humankind thrives because of our ability to imagine and communicate thoughts, ideas and made-up stories. We make up the idea of nations, religions, laws, corporations, strictures, and even money, all fictions that ultimately bind us. But fiction also frees us – by allowing escape, imagining possibilities different from the present, and building a future. How does fiction intersect with sexuality? How is our imagination of, and enactment of, our self shaped by our reading and writing of fiction? In Plainspeak’s September issue examines the role – positive, negative, or blurred – of fiction in sexuality.

October: Caste and Sexuality
Ambedkar may have had a vision to make India caste-free, but caste is still flourishing in India and its neighbouring countries. Where one is on the caste spectrum is inextricably, and often irrevocably, tied to their sexualityCaste follows one throughout life, with a privileged few able to live their lives claiming ‘it doesn’t matter’ to them. As do different forms of othering globally, including racial discrimination and control of indigenous peoples. What are the many ways caste (and the myriad forms of othering) and sexuality meet, influence each other and set the course for one’s sexual expression, behaviour and identity? These are some questions that the October issue of In Plainspeak on caste and sexuality addresses.

November: Time and Sexuality
Aspects of sexuality change with the passage of time in the lives of individuals as well as of societies. People find that what mattered a few years ago doesn’t anymore, and grapple with changes as new concerns, freedoms and expressions of sexuality take over. Societies, too, mark a non-linear path, progressing on some fronts with time and regressing on others. Technologies, laws, religions and cultures bring fascinating, worrisome, innovative changes, some restrictive and others liberatory, to our expressions of sexuality. The November issue of In Plainspeak explores  how time and sexuality interact, be it in the moments that mark individual lives or the larger public histories that shape entire societies.

December: Freedom and Sexuality
What would it be like to have no limits when it comes to expressing sexuality? No societal stigma, no familial, societal or governmental control – just the freedom to articulate and pursue one’s thoughts, emotions and desires? But the reality is that sexuality is heavily regulated by institutions like the state, religion and the family. This issue of In Plainspeak explores what it could mean to freely experience and assert the right to sexual agency. It also reflects on current barriers to this freedom and the ways that it is asserted or denied, based on gender, caste, sexual orientation and more. It challenges readers to imagine new frontiers in sexual expression and the ways we can cross them, and get to where we want to be.

2018

An illustration of three birds sitting on a tree branch. They all have colourful patterns drawn on them.

January: Anniversary Issue
For the past four years, In Plainspeak has published articles highlighting the diversity of issues related to sexuality in the Global South and the universal importance of sexuality. We’ve explored the ways that sexuality is connected to many different concepts – some which were evident and others that were a bit more surprising. The January issue of In Plainspeak is a compilation of selected articles from our archives.

February: Friendship and Sexuality
Romantic relationships are often the focus in discussions about sexuality, but what about friendship? Friendship can shape our perceptions of pleasure, desire and sexual norms. It can be a space for solidarity and openness, or one that reinforces myths and stigma. In this issue of In Plainspeak we will highlight the ways that friendship can encourage, undermine, censor or protect free expression. We will also interrogate the boundary between friendship and romance, and explore the intimacies that exist between friends.

March: Home and Sexuality
Our conceptions of home shape not only how we view sexuality but also how we are able to express it. Sometimes in order to fully assert our sexuality, we may need to adjust our idea of home spatially, geographically and/or in the abstract. Home can be a private place where we can explore our deepest fantasies and desires, but it can also be restrictive, limiting not only what we can do but also who we are. For some, leaving home for the first time opens up an entire world of possibility. On a broader level, society’s sexual norms and taboos shift as people migrate and create new homes. The March issue of In Plainspeak will delve into the ways that individuals and cultures use the concept of “home” to both open up and restrict the ways that people express sexuality.

April: Memory and Sexuality
Memory is often fragile, linked intimately with subjectivity and social conditioning. The way we remember things is linked to the way we see the world and ourselves, and that in turn is what influences our sexual expression. Our perceptions of a certain event, on both a personal and cultural level, often inform the development of our own individual sexual expression as well as broader sexual norms and taboos. Many times, these perceptions are influenced by personal opinion or societal pressure. Memory is as much a tool for perpetuating violence as it is a medium for self-actualisation and acceptance. The April issue of In Plainspeak traverses these various labyrinthine landscapes that memory and consciousness lead us into.

May: Language and Sexuality
Language is a means by which we communicate our thoughts, desires, and emotions. But beyond communication, language also mirrors and influences what society recognizes as acceptable or despicable. We use words to name, to describe, to extoll or to ridicule ideas, people, ways of being and ways of loving, among many other things. We do not have words for that which we do not know of or acknowledge and consequently, sometimes unwittingly, negate it. In the context of sexuality, language is central to how we do or do not express ourselves, access health services and information, pursue pleasure, assert our identities, and more. In the May issue of In Plainspeak, we will explore the ways that communities and individuals use language as both a mechanism for policing, discriminating and negating, and a tool for awareness, acceptance and liberation.

June: Wellbeing and Sexuality 
Wellbeing flourishes on a plane that while encompassing the physical goes way beyond it. It is fed by the spaces we occupy (both on a personal and larger level), and it thrives in the freedom of individual thoughts, opinions and emotions as well as our collective sense of psychological and social contentment. Sexuality, and the affirmation of identity and individuality as well as the sense of being a part of a greater whole it brings, can be both a catalyst for and product of a holistic state of wellbeing.
Some of the silken skeins in the delicate yet tensile web of sexual wellbeing are the support systems that enrich us, that offer us the freedom and safety to articulate our sexual desires, fantasies, and sexual agency; the processes of self-care and self-pleasure we perform; and the ways we perceive our bodies and how we exercise our bodily autonomy. When sexual freedoms and sexual health are woven together, our “ways of being” are deeply enhanced. The June issue of In Plainspeak seeks to explore these very interdependencies between wellbeing and sexuality, and how they impact our overall quality of life.
Current Issue:
July: Power and Sexuality
Power is both precarious and pervasive, seeping into and leaching out of the personal and social structures we inhabit, and by extension, influencing the ways in which we experience and express our sexuality. Physical acts of sex as well as the ways we arrive at sexual pleasure, affirm or negate consent, and perceive both our own and our partners’ bodies reveal  a complex interplay of power relations. But even beyond the physical, the socio-political hierarchies of class, caste, gender and other inequalities are also often replicated in sexual relations and individual perceptions of desire. Therefore, these manifestations of power, or the lack of it, become closely linked to our sexual agency, control, and individual freedom. But agency, too, is fraught with complexity – it is dependent on how the zeitgeist conditions our attitudes to sex and sexuality, and hence, retains the possibility of giving way to violence as much as it has the potential to be liberating and pleasure-affirming.  The July issue of In Plainspeak seeks to confront and interrogate how power plays out in our practices and beliefs surrounding sex and sexuality.

Upcoming Issues:

August: Desire and Sexuality
To desire is to be human. Desire inheres in the ways in which we perceive ourselves and the world. Complex, subjective, and multifaceted, it fuels sexual intimacy, sexual pleasure, and the exploration and expression of our bodies. With desire come fantasy and the need for the freedom and agency to explore our fantasies. These fantasies can go beyond existing socially acceptable modes of inhabiting and exhibiting sexuality and all that it entails. Desire can stir within us a longing for ‘something more, something different’. And so, turning into something radical and political it can transcend the personal to encompass a larger quest to challenge and break out of social stigmas, taboos, and morals.  The August issue of In Plainspeak will seek to engage with the diverse meanings and expressions of desire, and how they come together to inform and enrich our understandings of sexuality.
September – Performance and Sexuality
Human life is a constant ebb and flow of various forms of performance – not only do we perform (or conversely, refuse to perform) the socially mandated gender-essentialist roles assigned to us, but we also ‘perform’ our individual value systems through our ways and modes of being. We are part of larger structures that often govern our actions, and in them, what we present to the world become markers of our identity. It is this identity that becomes linked to our sexuality, connecting our external social and cultural performativity to the internal experiences of desire and sexual freedom. But ‘performance’, on a more literal level, also includes the realms of art, creativity and diversity of thought, which too can become an important cultural medium for both sexual self-expression and the questioning of norms. Therefore, ‘performance’ can be both subversive and conformist as, it can involve both challenging and adhering to status quos. The September issue of In Plainspeak explores the complex ways in which these varied performances are carried out, and how they connect with notions of sexuality.
October – Beauty and Sexuality
Beauty is often seen as a marker for sexuality – what society considers beautiful is usually also heavily sexualised. But the reality is that socially imposed notions of beauty are not wholly representative; every person has a different idea of what makes someone or something beautiful. In this way, the concept of beauty illustrates the diversity that exists within human sexuality. It is used to demonstrate different facets of sexuality such as gender, sexual orientation, and more. These core parts of our identity and sexuality influence the ways we perceive beauty and what we do to feel beautiful. Beauty and sexual expression are also constantly affecting each other: beauty inspires and can define sexual expression, and sexual expression can shift individual ideas of beauty. Rigid ideas of what is beautiful, sexy, or desirable can reinforce oppressive structures, but when these concepts are more flexible they can be subversive as well. The October issue of In Plainspeak will delve into the relationship between beauty and sexuality and explore its various facets
November – Sex and Sexuality
Sex is usually the first thing that comes to mind when most people think of sexuality. Core parts of our identities are often defined by sex: who we are having sex with, how we like to have sex, whether or not we want to have sex, and at what age we first had sex. Sexuality is certainly not limited to these questions, but sex plays a key role in developing the varied facets of sexuality. It is one of the many ways that people express their sexuality, and it can help people explore their own sexual orientation, gender, body image, fantasies, and more. For some, it can hold great significance as a form of love, pleasure, labour, or as a source of trauma. The November issue of In Plainspeak will reflect on the multitude of ways that people experience sex and use it to express their sexuality.
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