A digital magazine on sexuality in the Global South

Author: Curated Content

illustration of a floral wallpaper, against which you can see a door

‘Aap Karthe Mere Saath Sex?’

He sighs and says – aapko apni dil ki baat bataane ka mann kar raha hai (I want to tell you a secret, a matter of my heart). I nod and encourage him to do so. Aap bura toh nahi maanengi? (You won’t feel offended, will you?) Confused and immensely curious, I assure him that I will not take offense. Asal mein, mera mechanic ka kaam tha aur who theek hi tha lekin mere dost ne auto drivering karke ye seekha ki auto drivering karne se sex karna bahut easy ho jaata hai (In reality, I was working as a mechanic and everything was going fine but one of my friends who became an auto driver soon learned that it was very easy to have sex this way).
A woman with long dark hair stares into her phone, seemingly taking a selfie

On TikTok, the Party Don’t Start Till These Women Walk In

But TikTok is giving young people – particularly women – in South Asia a new avenue to showcase their talents. While for the majority of women using the app their fame is exclusive to TikTok, an increasing number are able to use it to get paid work. And for many, the platform represents a scarce opportunity for bodily autonomy, and a chance to carve out space as a performer in the face of film and fashion industries that shut them out.
A still from Pixar's 'Purl', showing a smiling pink ball of yarn

Video Page: Purl

In Pixar’s short film Purl, a pink ball of yarn – a stand-in for anyone who’s ‘different’ – is faced with this dilemma in a workplace context (the analogy would work in other contexts as well).
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