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The Editorial : Caste and Sexuality

A deeply entrenched issue in Indian society, the monster of caste, as Dr. Ambedkar called it, derides, tramples upon, rips asunder, and rapaciously brutalizes not only potential matings and marriages but also the most delicate and fragile burgeonings of desire as well as the aspirations of those who seek being other than what they are…
March in ‘In Plainspeak': Marriage and Sexuality

The Editorial: Marriage and Sexuality

Traditionally, marriage and sexuality have been bagged together and tinted with a bed-of-roses romance that has, over the last century or so, been unpacked and critiqued for propagating oppressive societal structures of gender, class, caste, and sexuality. Indeed, marriage isn’t just about two wedded souls matched in heaven, but about earthly ties that reach far beyond the couple it binds together. What happens when the roses are let out of the bag? This month’s issues of In Plainspeak on Marriage and Sexuality invite us to lean in and take a whiff.
Painting of a bird teaching alphabet to its young ones.

The Editorial: Parenting and Sexuality

How much do our parents teach us about ourselves? If science and psychology have proved that sexuality and sexual development grow and bloom in the course of our lives along with our other faculties, what role do our parents have in what we learn about sexuality? And, as parents, surely there’s so much we learn about sexuality, ourselves, and everything else from essaying the role? To parent is to learn how to teach what we already know, and to be able to receive more than a few surprise lessons ourselves.
Drawing of lipsticks, nailpolish, eye lash curlers, mirror, and Q-tip scattered everywhere.

The Editorial: Attire and Sexuality

Where perhaps attire traditionally demarcates community identity (one’s tribe, religion, caste, class, etc.), it has in more recent times (along with other identifiable commodities) come to also be used to express, assert, assess, control and contest individual identity. How does sexuality come into play in matters of attire and identity? And how do they all relate to how we live and connect with each other?
Illustration of the female reproductive system

The Editorial: Science and Sexuality

With Assisted Reproductive Technologies, science has managed to use technology to prise apart previous associations between reproduction and sex. With gender, class and queer theory, the social sciences have prised apart previous associations between gender and sex. We have found that knowledge through science, like knowledge of sexuality, can’t be pinned down to absolutes. “The more you know, the more you know you don’t know,” said Aristotle. While science may value the systematic and objective, it cannot escape the baffling convolutions of lived experience. How does life influence knowledge, and knowledge influence life?
An adult female receiving a vaccination that was administered by a public health clinician by way of a jet injector.

The (Pseudo) Science of Not Trusting Women

Medical abortion is a threat to scientific authorities because it is technology easily used without the help of a medical provider. Since there is doubt that women will use the drug safely without supervision (even though they did it before and are still doing it), some think the kinder option is to remove their opportunity to fail.
Comic panels. A woman with a matchstick lights a man who has a candle wick coming out of his head. He then burns and melts down into a pool of wax. The woman takes off her dress, and jumps into the pool on the ground.

The Editorial: Relationships and Sexuality

Is there a relationship at all that cannot be defined by love? And, if we were to begin talking of relationships other than romantic love, how would we speak of sexuality? Upon this deliberation, we realised that our Love and Sexuality issue seemed to revolve around romantic love and sex. The departure this issue on Relationships and Sexuality makes is to try and incorporate forms of relationships that might not be about romantic love but have their own kind of romance, and facets of sexuality that might not be about sex per se but will place its interest in alternate relationships to it.
In Plainspeak English Audit In Plainspeak English Audit 100% 10 Drawing of a woman with newspaper clippings in foreshadow. Screen reader support enabled. Drawing of a woman with newspaper clippings in foreshadow.

The Editorial: Sex Work and Sexuality

Not only has evolving discourse on sexuality influenced the fate of how sex work is understood, but also with the growth of sex workers’ rights movements, discourses on sex work are now being able to influence how we think about sexuality. In our issues on Sex Work and Sexuality this month, we hope to be able to traverse some of these convergences.
In Plainspeak English Audit In Plainspeak English Audit 100% 10 Painting of 3 women facing a sea. They rest their heads together, and have frogs and lizards circling their neck. Screen reader support enabled. Painting of 3 women facing a sea. They rest their heads together, and have frogs and lizards circling their neck.

The Editorial: Humour and Sexuality

“Humour is a rubber sword – it allows you to make a point without drawing blood.” Mary Hirsch, humourist Here's wishing all our readers a great year 2016! In a world where everything seems to have its place, humour is a slippery fish. Who hasn’t, after having burst into unconscious laughter in a darkened movie theatre,…
Still from film "The Lovedance" (2000). A bare-chested man smelling a woman's hair from behind. She wears a red bindi on her forehead.

The Editorial: HIV and Sexuality

On World AIDS Day, we published the first issue of this month’s In Plainspeak with the theme HIV and Sexuality. Global funding for research and work around HIV issues has dried out over the past decade or so, with official statistics declaring it a slowing-down affliction; according to reports, it is a “declining trend”, with a 19%…
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